Malta: 6 Unmissable Things to Do

The Maltese islands are steeped in 7, 000 years of history, unveiling a slice of the past with historic sites, museums and churches, and striking 16th century architecture. The tiny yet elegant capital, Valletta, was named a European Capital of Culture in 2018 and is a UNESCO World Heritage Site. Home to wine bars, restaurants, ancient landmarks and many other points of interest, Valletta is well worth a visit.

Elsewhere, there are plenty of outdoor adventures to be had thanks to near year-round sun, the famous Blue Lagoon and Blue Grotto Caves. And if music and nightlife is your thing, Malta’s burgeoning creative scene welcomes music festivals and cultural events throughout the year.

So if you have a week to roam around this wonderful place, here are some of the best things to do. Don’t forget your cameras!

Comino – Blue Lagoon

Found on the neighbouring island of Comino, this hidden gem boasts crystal-clear water and provides one of the most spectacular sights of the Maltese archipelago.

Blue Grotto

Located on the southern coast of the island, right across from the little islet of Filfla, these unique sea caves attract more than 100, 000 visitors each year. They are extremely popular with snorkelers and local boat trips for the clear and deep azure waters. When the sunlight catches the water, magnificent reflections are made

Marsaxlokk Fish Market

On Sundays, the traditional fishing village of Marsaxlokk has an open-air market where you can bu fresh produce. The port itself is filled with striking blue, red and yellow wooden ‘luzzu’ boats which make the area great for photos.

Valletta – St John’s Co-Cathedral

Designed by architect Gerolamo Cassar, the Baroque cathedral was built between 1573 and 1578 as the place where the Knights would gather for communal worship. Till this very day, St John’s remains an important shrine and a sacred place of worship.

Three Cities of Cottonera

Vittoriosa, Senglea and Cospicua have provided a home and fortress to almost every people who settled on the islands. There’s a beautiful Grand Harbour full of yachts, and and local community traditions that have stood the test of time. The best way to see the area is on a boat trip or walking tour.

Mdina Old City

The oldest inhabited city on the island is known as the Silent City, where few cars are allowed to enter and noise restrictions are in place. More than 4, 000 years old, the Apostle St. Paul is said to have lived after being shipwrecked.

If you love the sound of Malta, read more in our uncovered guide.